Press

December 10, 2018: “I really like this song and the meaning behind it. Fear is so prominent in our world and this addresses it head on. Although I have heard songs about facing fears, this is the first time I have heard this metaphor used…..and that’s what good songwriting is all about”. In reference to Scott’s song “Broken Horses” Head Judge Roy Elkins, Dallas Songwriter’s Contest and Founder.CEO of BroadJam

March 29, 2018: “An amazing songwriter and a real true-blue Americana Artist” WERA 96.7FM Music Alley Radio Show- DJ’s Carol Campbell and Marco Delmar

March 4th, 2018: “Featured artist for Episode 10 of the Cornbread Cafe. The best in new American Roots music.” DJ “The Mongrel”, Cornbread Cafe,

 

November 22, 2016 “Every so often it’s nice to find a record that plays to a lot of classic sounds, that can be relaxing and relatable.. The album opens on the bright and pop-infused title-track “Ordinary Day” which opts for harmonious chants instead full blown choruses…With a 90s Oasis feeling “Love Me To The End” bursts with big sounding guitars and building riffs…Thorn takes things a little darker on “I Don’t Want to Love You” infusing in a Carlos Satana style to his sound… There’s more of Thorn’s country sound on “Watch Out Wichita” with more slide guitar and twang than earlier on the record…Thorn’s voice and style come through more effectively…The love ballad “Call Me, Baby” The elegant guitar and soothing organ make it a relaxing track… “Freedom Road” mixes classic rock influence with modern country tone. The chorus is catchy, the riffs addictive and the harmonies infectious…“It’s A Beautiful Moment”… best collection of dynamics melodic riffs ”          Owen Maxwell, The Scene Magazine

 

February 20, 2018: “The relatively simple construction of Watch out Wichita allows for the vocal talents of Thorn to take center stage, and his unique style shines through perfectly. With personal yet relatable lyricism, Thorn invites the listener into his world. Exploring themes of love and loss, regret and days gone by, the song bears the marks of the musicians much-traveled life.”        Jeremy Bregman, Melobee Magazine